Watergate scandal and president nixon essay

The Watergate Scandal The Watergate Scandal was a series of crimes committed by the President and his staff, who were found to spied on and harassed political opponents, accepted illegal campaign contributions, and covered up their own misdeeds. On June 17,The Washington Post published a small story. In this story the reporters stated that five men had been arrested breaking into the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee.

Watergate scandal and president nixon essay

To Understand a Scandal: To date, Nixon is the only president of the United States to have resigned from office. He did so as a direct consequence of his involvement in the attempted cover-up of the links between the arrested men, the White House, and the Committee to Re-Elect the President officially named CRP, it became aptly known as CREEP during the presidential elections.

Even today, four decades after the events, it still symbolizes all that is, and might be, wrong with the workings of the federal government, elected officials and, ultimately, with the political system itself. Yet, we cannot understand Watergate and its consequences in isolation from the historical context in which they unfolded.

As Richard Nixon and his supporters often claimed in their own defense, such abuses were anything but oddities in American politics. Kennedy, and Lyndon B. Johnson, had indulged in similar under-handed tactics to gain and retain office.

Nevertheless, by the early s, neither a significant part of the press nor the great majority of the American public were prepared to accept that kind of behavior in public life. A former CIA operative, Hunt had been hired as a security assistant by the White House on the recommendation of presidential counsel Charles Colson inand had subsequently moved on to work for CRP.

The Bureau had itself become involved in the investigation of a mere burglary because once the police found wiretapping equipment, the investigation fell under its remit. While the attention of the Washington press corps and the public at large remained fixed on the unfolding presidential campaign, Richard Nixon and senior White House personnel including Chief-of-Staff Bob Haldeman and domestic policy tsar John Ehrlichman devised a strategy to block the investigation.

This began to unfold as early as June 23, a mere three days after the break-in. Two years later, however, the recording of that conversation between Nixon and Haldeman devising a plan to obstruct the FBI investigation saw the light, became known as the "smoking-gun tape," and sealed the fate of the President.

During late and early the White House seemed to have succeeded in stalling the FBI investigation. By the time Gray fell into disgrace, James McCord—former CRP security chief and, amazingly, one of the five men already serving prison sentences—broke down and sent a letter to judge John Sirica admitting to having committed perjury during his trial and withdrawing the testimony in which he had blamed the CIA for the break-in.

Immediately afterwards, McCord led investigators into the White House, John Dean gave in too and, from April onwards, began to cooperate with the prosecution in exchange for leniency. Once the dam of lies cracked, it quickly collapsed under the increasing flow of revelations that would eventually drown the presidency.

By that point, therefore, the whole affair was being investigated by the Senate committee, Special Prosecutor Cox, and Judge John Sirica, not to mention Woodward and Bernstein of the Washington Post and an increasing number of journalists from other major national newspapers.

Instantly both Cox and Ervin demanded the tapes, which Nixon flatly refused to hand over, claiming executive privilege—that is, the right of the president to withhold information from Congress or the tribunals on national security grounds.

What was still a certainly growing suspicion became a certainty when, after the Supreme Court in United States v.

Richard Nixon ordered the President to hand over the tapes, the smoking-gun conversation became public on August 5, There is little evidence of Nixon approving of, or even having any prior knowledge of the break-in, which had been authorized by CRP senior staffers John Mitchell, Jeb Stuart Magruder, and Robert Mardian.

After a group of senior Republican senators led by Barry Goldwater let him know that they could not guarantee his tenure, Richard Nixon became the first president of the United States to resign from office, on August 8, Ford, granted the disgraced ex-president a full pardon, which put an end to all further investigations into his conduct in office.Watergate Scandal Victoria Daniele Constitutional History May 19, The Watergate Scandal involved a number of illegal activities that were designed to help President Richard Nixon win re-election.

The scandal involved burglary, wiretapping, campaign financing violations, and the use of government agencies to harm political opponents.

Essay The Watergate Scandal and the Resignation of President Richard Nixon - The Watergate Scandal and the Resignation of President Richard Nixon The Watergate Scandal and crisis that rocked the United States began on the early morning of June 17, with a small-scale burglary and it ended August 9, with the resignation of Republican President Richard Milhous Nixon.

Watergate scandal and president nixon essay

The Watergate Scandal Essay written by Unknown The Watergate Scandal was a series of crimes committed by the President and his staff, who were found to spied on and harassed political opponents, accepted illegal campaign contributions, and covered up their own misdeeds.

The Watergate scandal drew to a close when, to the considerable frustration of many segments of the American public, Nixon’s successor, Gerald R. Ford, granted the disgraced ex-president a full pardon, which put an end to all further investigations into his conduct in office.

Effective Papers: Essay on The Watergate Scandal

The Watergate Scandal Essay Examples. 33 total results. Account of the Administration of Richard Nixon and the Watergate Scandal. 2, words.

A Study of the Controversial Crime of President Nixon, the Watergate Scandal. 2, words. 5 pages. The Events Following the Exposure of the Watergate Scandal.

2, words. President Richard Nixon and the Watergate Scandal The White House, which pinned Nixon for his Involvement and reasons for the break- in.

Almost certain he would be impeached; Nixon resigned on August 8th,

Essay: The Watergate Scandal