Bottled water vs tap

Answer From Katherine Zeratsky, R. Tap water and bottled water are generally comparable in terms of safety. So the choice of tap or bottled is mostly a matter of personal preference.

Bottled water vs tap

Bottled water vs tap

By Colette Bouchez From the WebMD Archives Once upon a time, most of us could walk across a parking lot or push a stroller down the street without a bottle of water in our hands. Today, Americans consume the most bottled water of any country -- upwards of 25 billion liters a year, according to the Beverage Marketing Corporation, and most of it on the go.

Is it really any better for us than ordinary tap water? Olson adds that with the exception of a few isolated pockets of truly bad drinking water, most municipal systems and most bottled water sources are fairly equal in terms of contaminants and other health and safety issues.

Need more proof of equality? Continued Water, Water, Everywhere So if there is little difference between bottle and tap, is there any reason to spend the extra dough for bottled water?

Surprisingly, some experts say yes. While she says some municipal water systems are as good or better than some bottled waters -- even for these populations -- if you fall into one of these groups, you should make the effort to find out for sure.

And that may not be so easy. But right now only one bottled water company -- Athena -- reports being approved for immuno-suppressed patients. Finding out how other bottled waters fare may take a bit of digging. Water, Water, Everywhere So if there is little difference between bottle and tap, is there any reason to spend the extra dough for bottled water?

Continued "In order to make an educated decision about what water to drink, you have to look to individual vulnerabilities," says Brenda M. A case in point is fluoridation -- the process of adding the chemical fluoride to municipal water systems to help protect teeth.

Further, he says, a recent World Health Organization report cites 80 studies that have looked at the relationship between cardiovascular death and water "hardness" measured principally by magnesium and calcium content and concludes that a lack of magnesium is a heart disease risk factor we cannot ignore.

You have to read the label. Your water "should contain at least milligrams total dissolved solids TDSan indication of its mineral content," he says. Like those of us who can tell Coke from Pepsi, he says, some can tell tap from bottled water -- and even detect differences among the bottled brands.

Continued 1 Bottle at a Time While drinking bottled water may have its benefits, it also has its drawbacks. Further, some environmentalists charge that even when the water is safe to drink, the plastic bottles it comes in pose a hazard to the environment. Manufacturing them helps to pollute the air and burn oil resources, these groups say, and the bottles come back to haunt us a second time when they show up in landfills.

When burned, they produce byproducts that may be harmful to humans and the earth, according to the Earth Policy Institute.

Is Bottled Water Better?

Moreover, at least two Italian studies reported that chemicals used to make most water bottles could leach into the water itself. This could result in residues that, at least preliminarily, have been shown to disrupt DNA and increase cancer risks.

Scientists at the University of Nebraska had been experimenting with a natural "plastic" bottle made from corn. And when Zutler was ready to bring his BIOTA Colorado spring water to market, he helped fund the development of the new, planet-friendly corn bottle.

The bottle does not leach chemicals into its contents, Zutler says. Continued If the corn-based bottles do end up in a landfill, Zutler says, they burn clean. And he says that the manufacturing process saves over a barrel of oil for every 80 bottles consumed. Reusable up to 90 times, the filter turns any tap water into cleaner drinking water, while the corn bottle offers an environmentally safe way to carry it.

Press release, Athena Waters. Press release, New Wave Enviro Products. Michael Mascha, publisher, FineWaters.Bottled Water vs Tap Water Most people who drink bottled water also drink tap water, depending on the circumstances. Drinking water - tap, filtered, or bottled - is important for healthy hydration and plays a vital role in people’s lives.

Bottled water vs tap

Tap water and bottled water are generally comparable in terms of safety. So the choice of tap or bottled is mostly a matter of personal preference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees bottled water, while the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates tap water.

Processing. Although some bottled water comes from springs, more than 25% of bottled water comes from the municipal supply.

Natural mineral water and spring water is bottled at the source and may not be subject to any processing except the introduction of carbon dioxide. Bottled Water vs Tap Water Most people who drink bottled water also drink tap water, depending on the circumstances. Drinking water - tap, filtered, or bottled - is important for healthy hydration and plays a vital role in people’s lives.

Bottled water can be a drain on the environment and our health, but we still buy it. Find out more about why the tide may be turning to tap. Learn more about the pros and cons of both bottled water and tap water, so you can figure out which one is safer for your family to drink.

Processing. Although some bottled water comes from springs, more than 25% of bottled water comes from the municipal supply. Natural mineral water and spring water is bottled at the source and may not be subject to any processing except the introduction of carbon dioxide. While bottled water has a “healthy,” “pure” image, it is less regulated than tap water and significantly more expensive. Tap water is stored in reservoirs and carried into homes and offices through pipes; it is managed by local municipalities. Bottled water is packaged in plastic bottles and. Bottled water can be a drain on the environment and our health, but we still buy it. Find out more about why the tide may be turning to tap.
Should You Drink Tap or Bottled Water? - Scientific American